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Interesting question on prooflikes in general

Posted: Sun Jul 11, 2021 2:30 am
by vamtiques
Now can a LDS of a particular Morgan vam/number/mintmark ever be prooflike/DMPL, or is it always EDS's that are prooflike? Or is it that a prooflike coin becomes less so with multiple coins struck on the same dies leading to an LDS stage?

Reason I ask is the 1904-O (another thread) could be prooflike on the reverse, but the coin is likely LDS, therefore not sure.

Re: Interesting question on prooflikes in general

Posted: Sun Jul 11, 2021 2:38 am
by messydesk
Dies can be PL, even DMPL, and not EDS. Several VAMs are known to have repolished dies that were brought back to PL or DMPL. 78 VAM 33 comes to mind, some of the common CCs, some 80-S and 81-S.

Re: Interesting question on prooflikes in general

Posted: Sun Jul 11, 2021 2:58 am
by vamtiques
I find that to be very interesting messydesk :o.

Re: Interesting question on prooflikes in general

Posted: Sun Jul 11, 2021 4:03 pm
by vampicker
Yeah, proof-like or DMPL does not automatically equal EDS. I did an extensive study of the 78-CC years ago and have added to it since. Most of the marriages did not start off as DMPL. The stages with mirrors are more often found after polish jobs on mid and later states. Anecdotally from my observations, the non-EDS mirrors are nowhere nearly as durable as EDS PL or DMPL dies are. Said another way, the mirrors on new dies last much longer. I think it's part of the reason some dates are fairly common with PL and DMPL surfaces, while others like the 78-CC are rare in DMPL and scarce with PL surfaces.

Re: Interesting question on prooflikes in general

Posted: Mon Jul 12, 2021 1:58 am
by impairedsquirrel
Occasionally you'll hear the phrase "virgin DMPL" used to describe the difference between a "new" PL and a re-polished PL.

Re: Interesting question on prooflikes in general

Posted: Tue Jul 13, 2021 7:54 pm
by RogerB
Polishing that produces mirror-like fields lasts as long as it takes for the die to naturally deform and produce what we call "luster." Polishing and basining are repair actions for die faces and can be done at any part of the die life. The extent and aggressiveness of polishing determine if pre-repair defects remain visible. It also affects the clarity of design details, with excessive polishing (once or multiple times)possibly removing fine engraving lines and blurring boundaries.